The Antithesis of Combat: Shoulders of Giants

Shoulders of Giants
(by Maria Lindsey)

Whoever recognizes Plato’s “Republic” in the series of posts “The Antithesis of Combat“, even if it is only a small glimpse of it, with incomparably less philosophical and literary quality, is not in the face of mere coincidence. I have always admired the construction from scratch of Plato’s state in Book II of the “Republic”, and I think it came to my mind when I realized how inferior the adults are to children, and I decided to get rid of them (us) in “my state”.

Continue reading

The Uneducated Man

The uneducated man.
(“Portrait of Aristotle”, by Eric Gaba / CC BY-SA 2.5 / Derivative work)

It is hard to pinpoint exactly how I got to Philosophy, even though it all began just a few years ago. Things weren’t good in the company (again) and I was consumed by unidentified feelings of anxiety (as always), so I finally took the courage, quit my scientific job and became just a policeman. I couldn’t keep living a life of lies, pretending I was internally what I appeared to be externally. All I knew was that I needed answers for questions I could hardly formulate.

Continue reading

The Story of Civilization: The Conditions of Civilization

Or the demon of earthquake, by whose leave we build our cities, may shrug his shoulders and consume us indifferently.
Will Durant, “Our Oriental Heritage“, page 1.
(Port-au-Prince, Haiti, soon after the 2010 earthquake that killed more than 160,000 people.)

SUMMARY: Every civilization has economic, political, moral and social elements, and depends on geological and geographical conditions for its existence. But what preserves civilization is its transmission to our children — and the technique of such transmission is education.

Continue reading